military and technical objects


vehicles, ordnance and aircraft

Our main workshop is suitable for projects up to 14 metres long and no job is too heavy for our two gantry cranes with their four tonnes capacity. Objects are cleaned using ultrasonics, liquid cleaning or blasting.

firearms, armour and combat equipment

For these objects, we have a professional, well-equipped workshop and extensive secure storage areas. Historic Engineering meets all the legal requirements for handling weapons and holds all the necessary permits and licences.

 

case study large objects and weapons

German WW2 Fi-103 (V1) Flying bomb

customer requirement

This particular example of a Fi-103 flying bomb had been used by the Dutch Army for instructional purposes. It had large sections of the hull cutaway, the engine was split in half, and the nose section was missing. The goal was to re-create an accurate impression of the original V1, retaining as much of the original material as possible.

process and methods used

This project would require both restoration of the original hull, and reproduction of the missing parts. Sheet metal was added to the hull to fill the gaps that were cut out. The reproduction jet engine was built using steel and fibre glass, and a combination of steel tubing and MDF wood painted to simulate the engine grille. The nose section was copied from an original V1 nose, and reproduced in glass fibre. The wings were replicated based on an original set of (late war) wooden wings. The ribs of these wings were CNC machined, to create an easy to assemble frame.

result and findings

The completed V1 has been spray painted in a mix of coulours and rough 'camouflage', based on intense study of the rare WW2 images available. The mix of different processes on this object is a good example of what modern production methods can add to reconstructing vintage objects.

project imagery

 

case study large objects and weapons

German WW2 Sw36 60 cm searchlight

Domein Raversijde, Provincie West-Vlaanderen, Belgium

customer requirement

Domein Raversijde is a unique intact part of the WW2 'Atlantic Wall' at Oostende, Belgium. This 60 cm. searchlight was stood outside in sea-side salt air conditions for the past 20 years, and was to be restored as part of the renovation of the whole site. The object is planned to be exhibited indoors after restoration. This project included organising recovery and transport.

process and methods used

The object had suffered badly from salt sea air as might be expected. Having been sandblasted before, no original paint was left. This process was therefore repeated, after thoroughly washing of any salt deposits. Though aiming to keep as much of the original material as possible, a lot of (sheet) metal had to be replaced due to destructive rust damage. Original fittings were re-used whenever possible. Newly fabricated parts are recognisable as such by welding instead of the original riveting. The whole object was finally coated using a multi-layer industrial paint system, as originally required by the customer.

result and findings

Because of earlier inadequate treatment of the object, deterioration actually got worse. Also, no original colour reference survived. It was therefore decided that the object was to be painted in the standard dark grey, as found on many original WW2 photographs of similar searchlights.

project imagery